Develop delta-level interventions to respond to and mitigate against foreseeable coastal system tipping points

Rationale: Coastal fringes of deltas are among the most vulnerable landscapes as they are affected by catchment processes, sea-level rise, cyclones and storm surges, and over-exploitation of resources.

Rationale: Coastal fringes of deltas are among the most vulnerable landscapes as they are affected by catchment processes, sea-level rise, cyclones and storm surges, and over-exploitation of resources.

Living Deltas mangrove extent change (1996-2016)

 

Mangrove forests are stunning environments which underpin rich and complex ecosystems. Mangroves are also vital for society, providing us with food and clean water, protection from coastal flooding, and the capacity to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. Mangroves are also dynamic environments, and can erode and expand rapidly in response to human and natural drivers. By understanding how and why mangroves are changing, we can better understand the value and vulnerability of our mangrove forests. This map shows how mangrove extent has changed between 1996 and 2016 for the Living Deltas target regions: The Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Mekong, and Red River Deltas. The data comes from the Global Mangrove Watch project who use satellite images to track mangrove change over time (https://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/45

 

Thorsten Balke

Adrian Bass

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Emile Cremin

Nhu Do

Efi Foufoula-Georgiou

Tuhin Ghosh

Diem Huynh

Shah Alam Khan

Cai Ladd

 

 

Andy Large

Hue Le

Qiuhua Liang

Umme Kulsum Navera

Giang Nguyen

Hue Nguyen

Lan Nguyen

Tanh Nguyen Tran Nhan

Vinh Nguyen

 

 

 

 

Khanh Phan

Fabrice Renaud

Sylvia Szabo

Alex Tejedor

Ha Tran

Trung Chi Tran

Lawrence Vulis

Anis Rahman Majumdar

Ying Zheng

The Team

The status of the delta fringe can act as an early warning signal for the entire delta social-ecological system (SES). WP4 will characterize coastal social-ecological tipping points. Through innovative and holistic multi-stakeholder approaches, WP4 will, for the first time, characterise tipping-point thresholds, risks and opportunities for coastal areas. Using this knowledge, we will propose delta-level interventions to avoid negative tipping points and favour positive transformation towards desired SES states.

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Develop delta-level interventions to respond to and mitigate against foreseeable coastal system tipping points

The status of the delta fringe can act as an early warning signal for the entire delta social-ecological system (SES). WP4 will characterize coastal social-ecological tipping points. Through innovative and holistic multi-stakeholder approaches, WP4 will, for the first time, characterise tipping-point thresholds, risks and opportunities for coastal areas. Using this knowledge, we will propose delta-level interventions to avoid negative tipping points and favour positive transformation towards desired SES states.

Rationale: Coastal fringes of deltas are among the most vulnerable landscapes as they are affected by catchment processes, sea-level rise, cyclones and storm surges, and over-exploitation of resources.

Develop delta-level interventions to respond to and mitigate against foreseeable coastal system tipping points

Living Deltas mangrove extent change (1996-2016)

 

Mangrove forests are stunning environments which underpin rich and complex ecosystems. Mangroves are also vital for society, providing us with food and clean water, protection from coastal flooding, and the capacity to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. Mangroves are also dynamic environments, and can erode and expand rapidly in response to human and natural drivers. By understanding how and why mangroves are changing, we can better understand the value and vulnerability of our mangrove forests. This map shows how mangrove extent has changed between 1996 and 2016 for the Living Deltas target regions: The Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Mekong, and Red River Deltas. The data comes from the Global Mangrove Watch project who use satellite images to track mangrove change over time (https://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/45

 

The status of the delta fringe can act as an early warning signal for the entire delta social-ecological system (SES). WP4 will characterize coastal social-ecological tipping points. Through innovative and holistic multi-stakeholder approaches, WP4 will, for the first time, characterise tipping-point thresholds, risks and opportunities for coastal areas. Using this knowledge, we will propose delta-level interventions to avoid negative tipping points and favour positive transformation towards desired SES states.

Thorsten Balke

Adrian Bass

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Emile Cremin

Nhu Do

Efi Foufoula-Georgiou

Tuhin Ghosh

Diem Huynh

Shah Alam Khan

Cai Ladd

Andy Large

Hue Le

Qiuhua Liang

Umme Kulsum Navera

Giang Nguyen

Hue Nguyen

Lan Nguyen

Tanh Nguyen Tran Nhan

Vinh Nguyen

Khanh Phan

Fabrice Renaud

Sylvia Szabo

Alex Tejedor

Ha Tran

Trung Chi Tran

Lawrence Vulis

Anis Rahman Majumdar

Ying Zheng

Living Deltas mangrove extent change (1996-2016)

 

Mangrove forests are stunning environments which underpin rich and complex ecosystems. Mangroves are also vital for society, providing us with food and clean water, protection from coastal flooding, and the capacity to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. Mangroves are also dynamic environments, and can erode and expand rapidly in response to human and natural drivers. By understanding how and why mangroves are changing, we can better understand the value and vulnerability of our mangrove forests. This map shows how mangrove extent has changed between 1996 and 2016 for the Living Deltas target regions: The Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Mekong, and Red River Deltas. The data comes from the Global Mangrove Watch project who use satellite images to track mangrove change over time (https://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/45

Thorsten Balke

Adrian Bass

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Emile Cremin

Nhu Do

Efi Foufoula-Georgiou

Tuhin Ghosh

Diem Huynh

Shah Alam Khan

Cai Ladd

Andy Large

Hue Le

Qiuhua Liang

Umme Kulsum Navera

Giang Nguyen

 

 

Hue Nguyen

Lan Nguyen

Tanh Nguyen Tran Nhan

Vinh Nguyen

Khanh Phan

Fabrice Renaud

Sylvia Szabo

Alex Tejedor

Ha Tran

Trung Chi Tran

Lawrence Vulis

Anis Rahman Majumdar

Ying Zheng

Develop delta-level interventions to respond to and mitigate against foreseeable coastal system tipping points

Rationale: Coastal fringes of deltas are among the most vulnerable landscapes as they are affected by catchment processes, sea-level rise, cyclones and storm surges, and over-exploitation of resources.

Living Deltas mangrove extent change (1996-2016)

 

Mangrove forests are stunning environments which underpin rich and complex ecosystems. Mangroves are also vital for society, providing us with food and clean water, protection from coastal flooding, and the capacity to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. Mangroves are also dynamic environments, and can erode and expand rapidly in response to human and natural drivers. By understanding how and why mangroves are changing, we can better understand the value and vulnerability of our mangrove forests. This map shows how mangrove extent has changed between 1996 and 2016 for the Living Deltas target regions: The Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Mekong, and Red River Deltas. The data comes from the Global Mangrove Watch project who use satellite images to track mangrove change over time (https://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/45

Thorsten Balke

Adrian Bass

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Emile Cremin

Nhu Do

Efi Foufoula-Georgiou

Tuhin Ghosh

Diem Huynh

Shah Alam Khan

Cai Ladd

Andy Large

Hue Le

Qiuhua Liang

Umme Kulsum Navera

Giang Nguyen

Hue Nguyen

Lan Nguyen

Tanh Nguyen Tran Nhan

Vinh Nguyen

Khanh Phan

Fabrice Renaud

Sylvia Szabo

Alex Tejedor

Ha Tran

Trung Chi Tran

Lawrence Vulis

Anis Rahman Majumdar

Ying Zheng

The status of the delta fringe can act as an early warning signal for the entire delta social-ecological system (SES). WP4 will characterize coastal social-ecological tipping points. Through innovative and holistic multi-stakeholder approaches, WP4 will, for the first time, characterise tipping-point thresholds, risks and opportunities for coastal areas. Using this knowledge, we will propose delta-level interventions to avoid negative tipping points and favour positive transformation towards desired SES states.