Heritage, Livelihoods and Delta Living: pasts, presents and alternative futures

Rationale: Disciplinary silos have limited understanding of the relationships between the heritages of diverse delta populations, their livelihood strategies, and impacts of human activities and environmental change upon deltas.

Jamie Amezaga

Matt Baillie-Smith

Helen Berry

Niki Black

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Cat Button

Nga Dao

Nga Do

 Adrian Hernandez

Oliver Hesengerth

The Team

Andy Large

Hue Le

Lan Nguyen Thi Ngoc

Tanh Nguyen

Giang Nguyen

Hue Nguyen

Vinh Nguyen

Sara Nowreen

Anis Rahman Majumdar

 

 

Maggie Roe

Manoj Roy

Souvanic Roy

Manas Sanyal

Graham Smith

Trung Chi Tran

Liz Todd

Kien van Nguyen

Pam Woolner

Siobhan Warrington

Work Package One explores the lived past, present and futures of diverse groups of delta dwellers using creative, participatory and oral history methods. It does this to help build more sustainable delta futures that reflect the lived experiences, cultures, histories and hopes of delta dwellers.

 

To achieve this, it brings together researchers from the arts, humanities and social sciences with expertise in diverse participatory approaches and a commitment to supporting more relevant and inclusive policymaking.

 

We will work collaboratively with women and men (including young people) living in the deltas to explore and document past experiences, present realities and visions for the future. Across the Mekong, Red River and Ganges Meghna-Brahmaputra culture, relationships and livelihoods are intricately connected to socio-ecological systems.  An appreciation of subjectivity, and that experiences are influenced by factors including gender, age and ethnicity,  will underpin our approach across the following three areas.

 

Contemporary Culture and Cultural Heritage

Contemporary culture is understood as the composite body of knowledge - practices, ideas and social behaviours - and cultural heritage as the continuous process of subjectively inheriting this knowledge and associated content, the legacy of the past, transferred through the present, towards the future.  Using creative methods, we will explore the ways that culture is understood, practised and transmitted and the contribution of culture, both contemporary and heritage, to the current lives and future resilience of people in the deltas.

 

Older people and ageing

Older delta dwellers have lived through rapid historical change including, for some, rising standards of living and life expectancy. However, the same period has seen increasing environmental degradation. These older women and men have individual and collective understandings of such changes, but this expertise has traditionally been ignored in policy making. Using oral history we will explore the relationship between environmental change, livelihoods and tangible and intangible heritage over a significant historical duration. We are particularly interested in the role of older women and men in cultural transmission and intergenerational dialogues about the environment.

 

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

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Work Package One explores the lived past, present and futures of diverse groups of delta dwellers using creative, participatory and oral history methods. It does this to help build more sustainable delta futures that reflect the lived experiences, cultures, histories and hopes of delta dwellers.

 

To achieve this, it brings together researchers from the arts, humanities and social sciences with expertise in diverse participatory approaches and a commitment to supporting more relevant and inclusive policymaking.

 

We will work collaboratively with women and men (including young people) living in the deltas to explore and document past experiences, present realities and visions for the future. Across the Mekong, Red River and Ganges Meghna-Brahmaputra culture, relationships and livelihoods are intricately connected to socio-ecological systems.  An appreciation of subjectivity, and that experiences are influenced by factors including gender, age and ethnicity,  will underpin our approach across the following three areas.

 

Contemporary Culture and Cultural Heritage

Contemporary culture is understood as the composite body of knowledge - practices, ideas and social behaviours - and cultural heritage as the continuous process of subjectively inheriting this knowledge and associated content, the legacy of the past, transferred through the present, towards the future.  Using creative methods, we will explore the ways that culture is understood, practised and transmitted and the contribution of culture, both contemporary and heritage, to the current lives and future resilience of people in the deltas.

 

 

Older people and ageing

Older delta dwellers have lived through rapid historical change including, for some, rising standards of living and life expectancy. However, the same period has seen increasing environmental degradation. These older women and men have individual and collective understandings of such changes, but this expertise has traditionally been ignored in policy making. Using oral history we will explore the relationship between environmental change, livelihoods and tangible and intangible heritage over a significant historical duration. We are particularly interested in the role of older women and men in cultural transmission and intergenerational dialogues about the environment.

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Heritage, Livelihoods and Delta Living: pasts, presents and alternative futures

Rationale: Disciplinary silos have limited understanding of the relationships between the heritages of diverse delta populations, their livelihood strategies, and impacts of human activities and environmental change upon deltas.

To achieve this, it brings together researchers from the arts, humanities and social sciences with expertise in diverse participatory approaches and a commitment to supporting more relevant and inclusive policymaking.

 

We will work collaboratively with women and men (including young people) living in the deltas to explore and document past experiences, present realities and visions for the future. Across the Mekong, Red River and Ganges Meghna-Brahmaputra culture, relationships and livelihoods are intricately connected to socio-ecological systems.  An appreciation of subjectivity, and that experiences are influenced by factors including gender, age and ethnicity,  will underpin our approach across the following three areas.

 

Contemporary Culture and Cultural Heritage

Contemporary culture is understood as the composite body of knowledge - practices, ideas and social behaviours - and cultural heritage as the continuous process of subjectively inheriting this knowledge and associated content, the legacy of the past, transferred through the present, towards the future.  Using creative methods, we will explore the ways that culture is understood, practised and transmitted and the contribution of culture, both contemporary and heritage, to the current lives and future resilience of people in the deltas.

 

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Older people and ageing

Older delta dwellers have lived through rapid historical change including, for some, rising standards of living and life expectancy. However, the same period has seen increasing environmental degradation. These older women and men have individual and collective understandings of such changes, but this expertise has traditionally been ignored in policy making. Using oral history we will explore the relationship between environmental change, livelihoods and tangible and intangible heritage over a significant historical duration. We are particularly interested in the role of older women and men in cultural transmission and intergenerational dialogues about the environment.

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

WP1 will address this gap by co-producing knowledge with communities, individuals and households. It will use creative, participatory and interdisciplinary approaches. The outcome will be co-created understandings of the micro-level experiences of these changes, and communities’ capacities to respond to and shape their living environments. In turn this will inform policymaking for sustainable development. WP1 will create records of delta life over time, of shared heritage, voices, memories and histories, of material and cultural resources, and of beliefs and ideas of delta peoples.

Heritage, Livelihoods and Delta Living: pasts, presents and alternative futures

Rationale: Disciplinary silos have limited understanding of the relationships between the heritages of diverse delta populations, their livelihood strategies, and impacts of human activities and environmental change upon deltas.

To achieve this, it brings together researchers from the arts, humanities and social sciences with expertise in diverse participatory approaches and a commitment to supporting more relevant and inclusive policymaking.

 

We will work collaboratively with women and men (including young people) living in the deltas to explore and document past experiences, present realities and visions for the future. Across the Mekong, Red River and Ganges Meghna-Brahmaputra culture, relationships and livelihoods are intricately connected to socio-ecological systems.  An appreciation of subjectivity, and that experiences are influenced by factors including gender, age and ethnicity,  will underpin our approach across the following three areas.

 

Contemporary Culture and Cultural Heritage

Contemporary culture is understood as the composite body of knowledge - practices, ideas and social behaviours - and cultural heritage as the continuous process of subjectively inheriting this knowledge and associated content, the legacy of the past, transferred through the present, towards the future.  Using creative methods, we will explore the ways that culture is understood, practised and transmitted and the contribution of culture, both contemporary and heritage, to the current lives and future resilience of people in the deltas.

 

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Older people and ageing

Older delta dwellers have lived through rapid historical change including, for some, rising standards of living and life expectancy. However, the same period has seen increasing environmental degradation. These older women and men have individual and collective understandings of such changes, but this expertise has traditionally been ignored in policy making. Using oral history we will explore the relationship between environmental change, livelihoods and tangible and intangible heritage over a significant historical duration. We are particularly interested in the role of older women and men in cultural transmission and intergenerational dialogues about the environment.

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Jamie Amezaga

Matt Baillie-Smith

Helen Berry

Niki Black

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Cat Button

Nga Dao

Nga Do

 Adrian Hernandez

Oliver Hesengerth

Andy Large

Hue Le

Lan Nguyen Thi Ngoc

Tanh Nguyen

Giang Nguyen

Hue Nguyen

Vinh Nguyen

Sara Nowreen

Anis Rahman Majumdar

 

 

Maggie Roe

Manoj Roy

Souvanic Roy

Manas Sanyal

Graham Smith

Trung Chi Tran

Liz Todd

Kien van Nguyen

Pam Woolner

Siobhan Warrington

WP1 will address this gap by co-producing knowledge with communities, individuals and households. It will use creative, participatory and interdisciplinary approaches. The outcome will be co-created understandings of the micro-level experiences of these changes, and communities’ capacities to respond to and shape their living environments. In turn this will inform policymaking for sustainable development. WP1 will create records of delta life over time, of shared heritage, voices, memories and histories, of material and cultural resources, and of beliefs and ideas of delta peoples.

To achieve this, it brings together researchers from the arts, humanities and social sciences with expertise in diverse participatory approaches and a commitment to supporting more relevant and inclusive policymaking.

 

We will work collaboratively with women and men (including young people) living in the deltas to explore and document past experiences, present realities and visions for the future. Across the Mekong, Red River and Ganges Meghna-Brahmaputra culture, relationships and livelihoods are intricately connected to socio-ecological systems.  An appreciation of subjectivity, and that experiences are influenced by factors including gender, age and ethnicity,  will underpin our approach across the following three areas.

 

Contemporary Culture and Cultural Heritage

Contemporary culture is understood as the composite body of knowledge - practices, ideas and social behaviours - and cultural heritage as the continuous process of subjectively inheriting this knowledge and associated content, the legacy of the past, transferred through the present, towards the future.  Using creative methods, we will explore the ways that culture is understood, practised and transmitted and the contribution of culture, both contemporary and heritage, to the current lives and future resilience of people in the deltas.

 

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Older people and ageing

Older delta dwellers have lived through rapid historical change including, for some, rising standards of living and life expectancy. However, the same period has seen increasing environmental degradation. These older women and men have individual and collective understandings of such changes, but this expertise has traditionally been ignored in policy making. Using oral history we will explore the relationship between environmental change, livelihoods and tangible and intangible heritage over a significant historical duration. We are particularly interested in the role of older women and men in cultural transmission and intergenerational dialogues about the environment.

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Jamie Amezaga

Matt Baillie-Smith

Helen Berry

Niki Black

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Cat Button

Nga Dao

Nga Do

 Adrian Hernandez

Oliver Hesengerth

Andy Large

Hue Le

Lan Nguyen Thi Ngoc

Tanh Nguyen

Giang Nguyen

Maggie Roe

Manoj Roy

Souvanic Roy

Manas Sanyal

Graham Smith

Trung Chi Tran

Liz Todd

Kien van Nguyen

Pam Woolner

Siobhan Warrington

Hue Nguyen

Vinh Nguyen

Sara Nowreen

Anis Rahman Majumdar

WP1 will address this gap by co-producing knowledge with communities, individuals and households. It will use creative, participatory and interdisciplinary approaches. The outcome will be co-created understandings of the micro-level experiences of these changes, and communities’ capacities to respond to and shape their living environments. In turn this will inform policymaking for sustainable development. WP1 will create records of delta life over time, of shared heritage, voices, memories and histories, of material and cultural resources, and of beliefs and ideas of delta peoples.

Heritage, Livelihoods and Delta Living: pasts, presents and alternative futures

Rationale: Disciplinary silos have limited understanding of the relationships between the heritages of diverse delta populations, their livelihood strategies, and impacts of human activities and environmental change upon deltas.

To achieve this, it brings together researchers from the arts, humanities and social sciences with expertise in diverse participatory approaches and a commitment to supporting more relevant and inclusive policymaking.

 

We will work collaboratively with women and men (including young people) living in the deltas to explore and document past experiences, present realities and visions for the future. Across the Mekong, Red River and Ganges Meghna-Brahmaputra culture, relationships and livelihoods are intricately connected to socio-ecological systems.  An appreciation of subjectivity, and that experiences are influenced by factors including gender, age and ethnicity,  will underpin our approach across the following three areas.

 

Contemporary Culture and Cultural Heritage

Contemporary culture is understood as the composite body of knowledge - practices, ideas and social behaviours - and cultural heritage as the continuous process of subjectively inheriting this knowledge and associated content, the legacy of the past, transferred through the present, towards the future.  Using creative methods, we will explore the ways that culture is understood, practised and transmitted and the contribution of culture, both contemporary and heritage, to the current lives and future resilience of people in the deltas.

 

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Older people and ageing

Older delta dwellers have lived through rapid historical change including, for some, rising standards of living and life expectancy. However, the same period has seen increasing environmental degradation. These older women and men have individual and collective understandings of such changes, but this expertise has traditionally been ignored in policy making. Using oral history we will explore the relationship between environmental change, livelihoods and tangible and intangible heritage over a significant historical duration. We are particularly interested in the role of older women and men in cultural transmission and intergenerational dialogues about the environment.

 

Youth livelihoods and delta futures

To build more sustainable delta futures, we need to understand young people’s experiences of life in the deltas, the challenges they face, their leisure, and the work they do to try and build more sustainable livelihoods and communities. Young people play critically important roles in responding to changes in the local socio-ecological systems, including through community mobilising and volunteering. Their voices are critical to developing more effective policy mechanisms for sustainable delta futures. Using youth-centred participatory methods, we will investigate: 1) the role of young people’s voices and experiences in existing delta governance and policy making processes; 2) young people’s experiences of delta living; and 3) youth agency in shaping more sustainable delta futures.

 

Jamie Amezaga

Matt Baillie-Smith

Helen Berry

Niki Black

Ha Ly Thi Bui

Cat Button

Nga Dao

Nga Do

 Adrian Hernandez

Oliver Hesengerth

Andy Large

Hue Le

Lan Nguyen Thi Ngoc

Tanh Nguyen

Giang Nguyen

Hue Nguyen

Vinh Nguyen

Sara Nowreen

Anis Rahman Majumdar

Maggie Roe

Manoj Roy

Souvanic Roy

Manas Sanyal

Graham Smith

Trung Chi Tran

Liz Todd

Kien van Nguyen

Pam Woolner

Siobhan Warrington

WP1 will address this gap by co-producing knowledge with communities, individuals and households. It will use creative, participatory and interdisciplinary approaches. The outcome will be co-created understandings of the micro-level experiences of these changes, and communities’ capacities to respond to and shape their living environments. In turn this will inform policymaking for sustainable development. WP1 will create records of delta life over time, of shared heritage, voices, memories and histories, of material and cultural resources, and of beliefs and ideas of delta peoples.

Heritage, Livelihoods and Delta Living: pasts, presents and alternative futures

Rationale: Disciplinary silos have limited understanding of the relationships between the heritages of diverse delta populations, their livelihood strategies, and impacts of human activities and environmental change upon deltas.